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Are We on the Verge of Becoming Western Money Slaves?

July 23, 2017 • Capitalism in the 21st Century, Global Capital MarketsComments (0)

By Peter Koenig Masked by economic “innovations”, the New World Order continues work its way to total world manipulation. In this article, Peter Koenig elaborates on the Order’s intricate and imprisoning strategies in its attempt to enslave all of us through its financial systems.   Electronic money, a cashless society, is perhaps the ultimate

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Navigating the Investment Minefield

July 10, 2017 • FINANCE & BANKING, Global Capital Markets, Responsible FinanceComments (0)

By H. Kent Baker and Vesa Puttonen Fraudsters are always on the look out for prey – investors they can manipulate and take advantage of. The authors discuss 8 traps you should look out for in navigating through the investment minefield. After all,

Hedge Funds: Past, Present, and Future

June 4, 2017 • FINANCE & BANKING, Global Capital MarketsComments (0)

By H. Kent Baker and Greg Filbeck “Hedge funds, private equity and venture capital funds have played an important role in providing liquidity to our financial system and improving the efficiency of capital markets. But as their role has grown, so have the

Currency Depreciation Can Save an Economy in Crisis

March 28, 2017 • GLOBAL ECONOMY, FINANCE & BANKING, Global Capital MarketsComments (0)

By Ivan Illán Amongst political and business leadership, there’s a popular bias that domestic currency depreciation and/or devaluation is negative for a nation’s economy. Instead, downward currency movements present a positive GDP benefit due to

Tax Avoidance: Between Temptation and Trouble

February 14, 2017 • FINANCE & BANKING, Global Capital Markets, Governance & Regulation, Personal FinanceComments (0)

By Matthias Kasper and Erich Kirchler Fostering tax compliance is a key challenge for global politics. Public revenues need to be protected, and confidence needs to be restored in a system that is deemed ineffective.   Conservative estimations indicate that

India – Crime of the Century – Financial Genocide

January 15, 2017 • FINANCE & BANKING, EMERGING TRENDS, Capitalism in the 21st Century, Global Capital Markets, IndiaComments (0)

By Peter Koenig On 8 November, Narendra Modi, the Indian Prime Minister, brutally declared all 500 (US$ 7) and 1,000 rupee-notes invalid. The final goal is speedy global demonetization. Electronic money, instead of cash, allows the hegemon to control the

How the Rand Exchange Rate Volatility Affects the South African Economy?

December 1, 2016 • GLOBAL ECONOMY, FINANCE & BANKING, Global Capital Markets, Middle East & AfricaComments (0)

By Matthew Kofi Ocran While the South African rand has historically been characterised with high volatilities, the recent levels of gyrations of the currency, particularly against the US dollar has been quite unprecedented. How does this volatility affect

China’s International Renminbi Is Coming – Is Wall Street Ready?

September 29, 2016 • GLOBAL ECONOMY, FINANCE & BANKING, EMERGING TRENDS, China, Global Capital MarketsComments (0)

By Dan Steinbock                On October 1, the Chinese renminbi officially becomes the fifth international reserve currency. Until recently, Washington played geopolitics to defer the renminbi’s internationalisation. But what about Wall

Usury in the 21st Century

June 28, 2016 • FINANCE & BANKING, EMERGING TRENDS, Capitalism in the 21st Century, Global Capital MarketsComments (1)

By Richard Westra Neoliberal deregulation commencing in the closing decades of the 20th century put into play a global financial system which operates as a reincarnation of ancient usury. You might also like: Food – Wars and Pharma – Trailblazing the Way

Active Investing? That’s So Twentieth Century

June 6, 2016 • FINANCE & BANKING, Editor’s Choice, Banking Innovation, Global Capital Markets, Personal Finance, Unprotected PostComments (0)

By Edward Morris The movement to passive investing has been unrelenting. Investors may harbour doubts that the markets are perfectly efficient, but they increasingly act as though they are, and index funds have become their investment of choice. The twentieth